Life Inside the Mountain
The Banff Centre, Canada
Pigmented abaca fiber, specimen pins
20W x 8H ft (6.1W x 2.44H m)
2010




Life Inside the Mountain (Detail)
Pigmented abaca fiber, specimen pins
2010




Life Inside the Mountain (Detail)
Pigmented abaca fiber, specimen pins
2010




Life Inside the Mountain (Detail)
Pigmented abaca fiber, specimen pins
2010




Life Inside the Mountain (Detail)
Pigmented abaca fiber, specimen pins
2010




Life Inside the Mountain (Detail)
Pigmented abaca fiber, specimen pins
2010




Life Inside the Mountain (Detail)
Pigmented abaca fiber, specimen pins
2010




Life Inside the Mountain
Suffolk University Gallery, MA
Exhibition View
2015




Life Inside the Mountain
Suffolk University Gallery, MA
Exhibition View
2015



Life Inside the Mountain
The Banff Centre, Canada

“A philosopher-thief took me to her bed and talked of time stretching back so far it made my head spin, talked of water moving over mountain ranges over millions and millions of years, drip on drip, small rivulets carving rock; she whispered of colonies of corals creating continents, of the minute skeletons of chalk creatures making cliffs, of seabed’s heaving up and slowly pushing fossilized oyster beds to the peaks of mountains hundreds of miles up and away from the sea; she murmured of continents drifting apart and back together again; and she entwined and unraveled mind and body so you stopped knowing where one finished and the other began.”

  • – Rebecca Stott, The Coral Thief
  • I imagine life inside the mountains, fossilized animals and flora pushed up from seabeds and coming alive again; a return to Romanticism when our understanding of the world was predicated on our understanding of nature; a return to the Garden of Eden when man and nature were one. In my invented mountainscape fossils come alive, rock becomes permeable, and hundreds of eyes gaze out at us, as we gaze back at them. I collect these specimens, pinning them down as evidence of their fantastic voyage and proof that I was actually here to imagine it.

    Life Inside the Mountain is a tactile visualization of the interior of the Canadian Rockies that were formed by the pushing up of seabeds over a billion years ago. The organisms are covered in eyes, giving life to their fossilized remains and suggesting a permeability of the mountain and contact with the viewer’s gaze. Attached to the wall with specimen pins, they suggest both a natural history collection and illustration.









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