Eyes of God
McIninch Gallery, SNHU
Exhibition View
2011




Eyes of God (Detail)
Gouache on Pigmented abaca fiber
2011




Eyes of God
Gouache on pigmented abaca fiber
7.87DIA in (20DIA cm)
2010




Eyes of God
Gouache on pigmented abaca fiber
7.87DIA in (20DIA cm)
2010




Eyes of God
Gouache on pigmented abaca fiber
7.87DIA in (20DIA cm)
2010




Eyes of God
Gouache on pigmented abaca fiber
7.87DIA in (20DIA cm)
2010




Eyes of God
Gouache on pigmented abaca fiber
7.87DIA in (20DIA cm)
2010




Eyes of God
Gouache on pigmented abaca fiber
7.87DIA in (20DIA cm)
2010




Eyes of God
Gouache on pigmented abaca fiber
7.87DIA in (20DIA cm)
2010




Eyes of God
Gouache on pigmented abaca fiber
7.87DIA in (20DIA cm)
2010




Eyes of God
Gouache on pigmented abaca fiber
7.87DIA in (20DIA cm)
2010




Eyes of God
Gouache on pigmented abaca fiber
7.87DIA in (20DIA cm)
2010




Eyes of God
Gouache on pigmented abaca fiber
7.87DIA in (20DIA cm)
2010




Eyes of God
Gouache on pigmented abaca fiber
7.87DIA in (20DIA cm)
2010



Eyes of God

In Eyes of God, the proximity between abstract geometry and flat color blocks renders the painted scientific mesh as a three-dimensional object. What were once discrete circular works on paper become a crowd of eyes that stares back at the viewer. The circles en masse suggest issues of cloning and genetic engineering, questioning the relationship between the work's constituents and its organic original.

For thousands of years the ‘Eye of God’ has been used as a symbol for the ‘all-knowing God.’ The solar eclipse, for example, is described by many as the ultimate ‘Eye of God.’ The ‘Eye’s’ appearance on our dollar bill and the Great Seal of the United States ('In God We trust'), its placement within the Masonic pyramid, its illustration on the palm of the hand in numerous cultures, as well as its appearance on prehistoric earth mounds, affirm its presence as a potent symbol in both our spiritual and material worlds. In Eyes of God, the use of finely processed and pigmented plant fiber creates an organic, translucent, and transitory context for investigating the relationship between science, technology and the natural world.









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