Drawn and Mirrored
New Bedford Art Museum, MA
Exhibition View
2013


Drawn and Mirrored
Acrylic on plexiglas, aluminum, artist's frames
2.44 x 4.57 m, dimensions variable
2013


Drawn and Mirrored (Detail)
Acrylic on plexiglas, aluminum, artist's frame
2013




Drawn and Mirrored (Detail)
Acrylic on plexiglas, aluminum, artist's frame
2013




Drawn and Mirrored (Detail)
Acrylic on plexiglas, aluminum, artist's frame
2013




Drawn and Mirrored (Detail)
Acrylic on plexiglas, aluminum, artist's frame
2013




Drawn and Mirrored (Detail)
Acrylic on plexiglas, aluminum, artist's frame
2013




Drawn and Mirrored, Index N.1
Acrylic on plexiglas, aluminum, artist's frame
96.5 x 119.4 cm
2013




Drawn and Mirrored, Index N.2
Acrylic on plexiglas, aluminum, artist's frame
96.5 x 119.4 cm
2013




Drawn and Mirrored, Index N.1 (Detail)
Acrylic on plexiglas, aluminum, artist's frame
2013




Drawn and Mirrored, Index N.2 (Detail)
Acrylic on plexiglas, aluminum, artist's frame
2013



Drawn and Mirrored

Drawn and Mirrored references the display methods of Victorian parlors and Renaissance wonder cabinets, densely punctuated encyclopedic collections of specimens and illustrations from the natural world. These historicized impulses to collect are analogous to the impulse to accumulate information in the digital age, in which computers and phones have become virtual wonder cabinets of visual and textual information.

The images in Drawn and Mirrored have their roots in scientific illustration and collection and begin with a non-objective organic drawing. Having a central radius, their complete forms evolve from the mirroring of the forms half. This aggregation or accumulation of related forms resides between the psychological inkblot, mirrored behaviors, and the bilateral symmetry inherent in natural forms, ranging from the simplest single-celled protozoa, to the complexity of the human body - its parts and its whole. Each completed form is again repeated and mirrored, so that two of each form appear in different orientations on the wall. Two ‘indexes’, whose size and proportion are equivalent to the educational classroom charts ubiquitous during the Victorian era, contain all of the mirrored forms in the installation.









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